3 Things to Remember When Scheduling On-Camera Interviews

In an earlier post, I wrote about the mistakes people make when trying to schedule on-camera interviews for their video project. One reader sent this question in response,

Great advice, Clint! Do you find it difficult to secure subjects for a sit-down interview in the midst of their busy schedules? Allotting for the appropriate amount of time and getting colleagues to allocate that time are two totally different challenges.

My answer? Absolutely. You can plan all the time in the world to conduct your interviews, but more often than not, you’re at the mercy of the employee’s actual day-to-day schedule. To help with this, here are three things everyone should think about:

Schedule Interviews In Advance

So many times I've seen company reps pull people for an interview at the absolute last minute and the employees just don't have enough time. Giving the subjects fair warning is not only considerate, but it will give them enough time to plan his or her schedule accordingly.

Try Scheduling the Interview Outside of Peak Hours

This might require coming in earlier or staying later, but if you can schedule your subjects for an interview when their schedules are more accommodating, then it will be better for everyone involved. You will have more time to conduct the interview and the subjects will be more focused on the interview and less worried about all of the things they may be missing back at their offices.

Build Excitement for the Project

The key is to get employees excited about the video, and to help them understand why their role in the piece is important. If employees don't feel integral to the process, it will be easy for them to brush you off. That's why I encourage the video team to get in front of all participants during pre-production; to lay out the vision, get their input, and get them motivated.

What other methods have worked for you when producing promotional videos? Leave them in the Comments.