3 Things to Remember When Scheduling On-Camera Interviews

In an earlier post, I wrote about the mistakes people make when trying to schedule on-camera interviews for their video project. One reader sent this question in response,

Great advice, Clint! Do you find it difficult to secure subjects for a sit-down interview in the midst of their busy schedules? Allotting for the appropriate amount of time and getting colleagues to allocate that time are two totally different challenges.

My answer? Absolutely. You can plan all the time in the world to conduct your interviews, but more often than not, you’re at the mercy of the employee’s actual day-to-day schedule. To help with this, here are three things everyone should think about:

Schedule Interviews In Advance

So many times I've seen company reps pull people for an interview at the absolute last minute and the employees just don't have enough time. Giving the subjects fair warning is not only considerate, but it will give them enough time to plan his or her schedule accordingly.

Try Scheduling the Interview Outside of Peak Hours

This might require coming in earlier or staying later, but if you can schedule your subjects for an interview when their schedules are more accommodating, then it will be better for everyone involved. You will have more time to conduct the interview and the subjects will be more focused on the interview and less worried about all of the things they may be missing back at their offices.

Build Excitement for the Project

The key is to get employees excited about the video, and to help them understand why their role in the piece is important. If employees don't feel integral to the process, it will be easy for them to brush you off. That's why I encourage the video team to get in front of all participants during pre-production; to lay out the vision, get their input, and get them motivated.

What other methods have worked for you when producing promotional videos? Leave them in the Comments.

One Big Reason Why a Video Strategy Is Crucial

One of the biggest misconceptions I encounter in the video production business is the belief that you can hire a crew to shoot something at the last minute, figure out what to do with it on the back end, and then turn that into an edited video that meets your marketing needs.

Here’s an important point to keep in mind:  Capturing video, for the sake of capturing video, is not a video strategy.

I’ve seen it happen time and time again. It usually goes something like this:

  • An important person in the company, or a key supporter of the organization, is coming to town at the last minute for a brief visit.

  • People in the marketing department think it will be great if a video crew could capture b-roll and a quick interview with this individual (or group).

  • They hastily hire a video crew, and ask them to show up and “spray” the event, getting a few quick sound bites before the VIP is rushed out the door for the next engagement.

  • Days, or weeks later, people in marketing get together (maybe) to discuss how to leverage the video to meet current marketing needs.

Maybe you can already see the problem with this approach. The main issue is that it’s a waste of money. Why hire a video crew to shoot an event when you don’t exactly know how (or if) the footage will be used? 

In an earlier post I wrote about things you and your team should think about before you start the process of producing a video. It’s important to include video as a part of your marketing strategy from the start, rather than waiting until after footage has already been captured.

Here’s one big reason why:

Key messaging and Calls-to-Action

Let’s say you don’t yet know what you want your video to say, or what purpose it will serve. But you forge ahead and hastily schedule an interview with a few key people, thinking that you will just figure it out later. You run down a list of boilerplate interview questions and call it a day. Then, weeks later when you finally come up with a strategy for your video, you find that none of the interview questions actually addressed the key messages you now want to include. You can’t really go back and make someone say what they didn’t say in the initial interview. And so you’re left with a generic piece of video that doesn’t really hit the mark and the window of opportunity has now closed.

Video should always be included on the front end of your marketing strategy, not only for the reason listed above, but for a myriad of other reasons as well, including (but not limited to) distribution platform considerations (Instagram, YouTube, Facebook, Twitter) and the nuances of each.

Have any other suggestions to improve your video marketing efforts? Leave them in the Comments.

How to Evoke Viewer Emotion In Your Next Video

People who work in video production want two main things from every video they produce:

  1. High production value

  2. Emotional response from viewers

The first can be achieved with the proper equipment and the proper technical training. The second, however, can be more elusive.

How do you create a story that stimulates a meaningful, emotional response from viewers that inspires them to act?

Obviously, if there was one tried-and-true answer to that question that I could bottle and sell, I could retire now. But the following episode from the podcast Revisionist History provides some fantastic insight on human emotion. I think if you work in video production it’s worth a listen. There are some important lessons to be learned and practices to implement that will help your next story illicit the kind of emotion that you want.

Here’s the episode. In it, Gladwell explores the country music industry and why its songs feel so much sadder than any rock ‘n roll ballad. If you can’t listen to the full 45-minute episode, here are a few sections you can skip to:

  • 00:00-06:45

  • 08:10-10:00

  • 15:04-18:40

  • 18:56-19:35

  • 20:35-21:09

  • 28:04-32:00

Rather than provide you with my own take-aways, I’d like to hear from you. Leave your thoughts in the Comments section. What stood out to you? What can we all do as video production professionals to ensure that our stories resonate with viewers?

And if you haven’t subscribed to Revisionist History, I encourage you to do so. It’s a fantastic podcast.

The Benefits of Vertical Video

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Vertical video. Among video professionals, the term may provoke feelings of frustration, anger, or disgust. Often it's been mocked and ridiculed as an invalid format choice (see below).

But vertical video is a preferred format for platforms like Snapchat and Instagram Stories. Already, vertical video has been added to my list of deliverables. Whenever I finish editing a project, I'm asked to create different versions, including one oriented vertically for social media. 

Last night I came across a thread on Twitter from Anthony Monteleone, a video editor I follow. He made some very good, rational arguments regarding vertical video I felt they were worth sharing and discussing. 

One immediate ramification I've seen in my own work with vertical video is that footage needs to be acquired in 4K. If you need to deliver vertically, it's nice to have that extra resolution to play around with when you have to scale up and crop in. Otherwise, the video can start to pixelate rather quickly.

What are your thoughts about the validity of vertical video? Continue the discussion in the Comments section below.